West Campus is the home of Claflin, Sleeper and Rich halls and the notorious West dining hall. To most Boston University students, this is the closest you’ll get to a typical college campus. While it’s still on Commonwealth Avenue, it’s still a home away from home.

If you’re a tad unlucky like me, you might get trapped in freshman housing for the second year in a row. While it seems like the most awful thing known to mankind, there are plenty of pros and cons to living in West as a sophomore.

West Campus has a typical college campus spirit that makes it an enjoyable place to live, even for sophomores. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

West Campus has a typical college campus spirit that makes it an enjoyable place to live, even for sophomores. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

1. West is best
That’s the motto. From games and concerts in Agganis Arena to breakfast for dinner in the dining hall, there’s nothing but pure joy over here.

2. The security guards have become your friends

Whether it’s a simple hello in passing or a full blown conversation about apple picking, the security guards are super friendly. One of the best decisions is to become friends with them from the beginning so that if you ever forget your ID, they’ll let it slide.

3. West is a giant family

You’re bound to see the same people in the dining hall from the study room last night. There’s an overwhelming sense of community in West Campus. Everyone gathers here for sports games, campus events and just to hang out. With T. Anthony’s and Dunkin’ Donuts on this side, everyone is bound to pass through at some point.

4. You know your way around

You know the ins and outs of the study rooms — which ones are quieter at certain hours and when the big study room is crowded. You know the dining hall hacks and have a good feel of what chefs are better at the omelet station and how to plan around that. (They’re actually all great.)

5. Most of the kids on your floor might be athletes

This means hours of silence and random outbursts of laughter. They have practice so they’re really good at time management, and they can even teach you a thing or two about balancing your life. If you’re lucky, they may all be track stars who need safety pins for their racing numbers, so you’ll be in luck when you need safety pins for a toga.

6. There will still be typical freshmen

On the weekends, freshman will crowd around the front of Rich Hall, waiting for a text with their finalized plans. As you and your upperclassmen friends walk past, you can reminisce on your first weeks as a freshman and all of the crazy nights that you now trade in for movie nights. They can be loud and obnoxious, but who wasn’t as a freshman? It’s part of the experience.

7. People will ask you for help

From the printing situation to directions to class, you will get a lot of questions. You get to be the cool hip aunt, giving advice on cool places to eat or even the best frat houses. Either way, lending a helping hand is something that just happens.

8. Nothing beats the sunsets

Honestly, some of the best sunsets I’ve ever seen have been from my dorm room. It may not be the same view you get from Myles Standish Hall that overlooks Fenway Park and Commonwealth Avenue, but it’s pretty damn good.

Sunsets are best seen from West Campus. PHOTO BY MADELINE FOLEY/ DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF.

Sunsets are best seen from West Campus. PHOTO BY MADELINE FOLEY/ DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF.

From time to time, it may seem awful when a good chunk of your friends already have apartments or places in StuVi, but West Campus becomes your home. The freshman dorms give you the true college experience. On top of that, West Campus is a safe haven away from the busy, bustling streets of Boston. It’s safe, clean and super fun. There isn’t any other place I would rather spend my first two years of college.