March is awesome in many aspects: spring break, Easter, major sneaker releases and the national phenomenon that made March famous, March Madness. In the beginning of March every year, virtually every publication posts some articles about tips and tricks (as if they actually work) to help get you the perfect bracket.

The bracket for the NCAA March Madness tournament was announced yesterday ahead of the start of the tournament Tuesday. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

The bracket for the NCAA March Madness tournament was announced yesterday ahead of the start of the tournament Tuesday. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS.

According to a research conducted by DePaul University Professor Jeff Bergen, the odds of getting the perfect bracket are one in approximately 9.2 quintillion, Business Insider reported. That is nine with 18 zeros behind it. In other words, you’re more likely to win the lottery than get the perfect bracket.

However, there’s still a possibility, and it’s worth a try. Therefore, here are some tips to get you the best bracket

1. Cross out the No. 16 and No. 15 seeds.
This might sound very brutal. This method, however, is quite reliable. As much as people love underdog stories, some teams have a very low chance of getting through the first round. For many of them, making the bracket is a triumph already.

No. 15-seeded teams had their moment when Florida Gulf Coast’s team made its way to the Sweet 16 two years ago. That is as far as the No. 15 seeds can go. Therefore, forget about those seeds.

2. Let Siri help you with the No. 8 and No. 9 seeds.

The omnipotent Siri has a coin flip function, if you haven’t noticed already. Most brackets go wrong when selecting these picks due to a very simple reason — people often overthink when picking between these two teams. Whether it is coaching, style of offense, key players or injuries status, including too many factors into this process actually harms your accuracy. Instead, ask Siri to flip a coin for you. As ridiculous as it sounds, this might be the best way to work out your bracket.

3. Be careful with the No. 10 through No. 12-seeded picks.

According to Davidson College Professor Tim Chartier, the No. 10 through No. 12-seeded teams make up 76 percent of the upsets. This is the real tricky part of the bracket. If possible, look up some of these teams’ stats from their past games and try to estimate their performance. If the team has good momentum — it’s either on a short winning streak or one of the key players performed well consistently in the past few games — the odds of this team upsetting its opponent increases drastically. If you really want to get a good bracket and brag about it in front of your friends, take some time and do some homework for this part.

4. Pick higher-seeded teams in the later rounds.

The championship landed on the top three seeds over the past 14 years, except for No. 7 University of Connecticut in 2014. In other words, if your top four picks don’t have any top seeding teams, you should probably think about rearranging your bracket.