The traditional preparation for expectant parents would include shopping for binkies, bottles and baby clothes. However, in addition to building cribs and changing diapers, parents are now increasing their list of responsibilities by handling their unborn child’s Twitter account.

A new phenomenon has taken over the world of parenthood: more and more millennial parents have started to create social media accounts for their unborn or newborn children. Parents feel the need to be prepared well in advance in case their desired Instagram username or email address is not available.

Parents are now creating social media accounts for their unborn and newborn babies, which begs the question: has this taken the social media craze too far? PHOTO VIA PIXABAY

Parents are now creating social media accounts for their unborn and newborn babies, which begs the question: has this taken the social media craze too far? PHOTO VIA PIXABAY

Well-known celebrity parents like Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher are in on the slightly wacky trend. Their rationale is that they don’t want their child to face any problems in the future if they, for example, are the CEO of a multinational company and need to maintain a professional online presence. The child’s name shouldn’t be linked with something shady on the Internet, and we all know that while the Internet is 100 percent a boon to society, it tends to be the one factor that can cause a person’s downfall. Booking a domain for your child 20 years in advance doesn’t seem so silly after all.

With social media playing a far more significant role in our lives than it did 20 years ago, I understand the growing to-do list of new parents. It’s sweet that millennial parents are so concerned for the wellbeing of their children, and that they’ve thought about every little aspect of their children’s lives that will eventually factor into their comfort and happiness.

In fact, creating a new social media account solely for your child would seem to be a better alternative to posting tons of baby pictures on your own Facebook profile. I do, however, think that it’s a little weird to be posting on your child’s behalf on their own account. I get the necessity for reserving usernames for your kid, but is it really vital to update their accounts on a daily basis when that time could and should be spent interacting with your child instead?

Many parents defended their actions by saying that posting pictures of their kid to their personal account made it easier to document their journey through childhood. Even then, there are other apps and less-public avenues to chronicle the days of your baby’s childhood. It is risky to post so many pictures — they could easily be misused once they fall in the wrong hands.

Ultimately, it is up to parents to choose how they want to parent. I would say that booking social account usernames shouldn’t be a priority, but if reserving usernames, URLs and Twitter handles for your child gives you peace of mind and allows you to sleep well at night, by all means go ahead. Who knows, in the future the skeptical parents might be hitting themselves in the head when their now 16-year-old child can’t get the Instagram username that they want.