Producers have always preferred to use real schools for films that take place in them. Why spend extra money building a set when the real thing already exists, right? And with the extremely limited funding for public schools, the extra money received from production companies doesn’t hurt. It’s a win-win.

Well, almost. The problem with this seemingly ideal exchange is that not all films set in high schools are as “kid friendly” as the typical “High School Musical” or “Bring It On” teen drama.

An investigation reveals that there was an accidental porn shoot at Alexander Hamilton High School in Los Angeles. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

An investigation reveals that there was an accidental porn shoot at Alexander Hamilton High School in Los Angeles, and teachers and parents alike are outraged. PHOTO VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

An investigation from NBC4 in Los Angeles recently uncovered an “accidental porn shoot” in an LA high school, featuring a nude carwash in the school’s parking lot. The film, “Revenge of the Petites,” is obviously not about sticking to the status quo, so how is it that the school happened to overlook the fact that there was a pornographic film being shot on their campus?

According to school officials, the production company behind the obscene film was misleading about the content that was being shot in front of Alexander Hamilton High School, claiming they were not aware of the inappropriate nature of the shoot.

This is not the only instance, however, that Los Angeles Unified School District schools have been involved in this kind of incident.

A Charli XCX music video was recently filmed at Birmingham Community Charter High School, another school in the LAUSD, for her song, “Break the Rules.” The song’s lyrics “getting high and getting wrecked / I don’t want to go to school,” are another example of clearly inappropriate content.

One strike could be seen as an honest mistake, but two? It is obvious that schools are being ridiculously careless when it comes to regulating films shot on campus. The fact that there was a six-month investigation on the subject should be indication enough — something about the way such cases are being handled is clearly not right.

“It is important that we ensure teaching and learning are not disrupted, and that all filming activity is appropriate for our schools,” said Superintendent Ramon Cortines in a statement following his ban on commercial filming on his school’s campuses.

Damaged equipment, class interruptions, increased tardiness and cancelled sports practices are only a few of the negative effects of such filming in schools. It is understandable for school districts to want, and even sometimes need, extra funding, but are new football uniforms and better cafeteria food worth disrupting students education?

Teachers, parents and students have all expressed their discontent with the inconveniences caused from these filming sessions, making the extension of this temporary ban sound better and better by the second. But the truth is that production companies have brought $10 million in revenue to this school district in the last five years, and it’s going to take more than a news investigation and a couple parent emails to put a stop to this industry.

 

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