By Katrina Uy, Blog Editor
@katreenz

Early holiday sales create less of an incentive for shoppers to seek out sales on Black Friday./PHOTO VIA Wikimedia Commons

Early holiday sales create less of an incentive for shoppers to seek out sales on Black Friday./PHOTO VIA Wikimedia Commons

Tired of the Black Friday craze? Apparently so are a lot of people — Black Friday sales from this weekend have gone down 11 percent from last year, according to statistics from the National Retail Federation.

A study done by the trade group reported that there was a 5.2 percent decrease in the number of shoppers from this weekend, both in stores and online.

With some stores starting their holiday sales earlier every year (some as early as Thanksgiving Day) it’s no wonder less shoppers are rushing to stores on Black Friday, the actual day many set aside for Christmas shopping. Others turn to online shopping in the comfort of their own homes as an alternative to waking up early on Friday morning to brave the crowds and long lines at stores.

It’s 2014, and some stores think they’ve got Black Friday all planned out, with some like K-Mart and RadioShack open as early as Thanksgiving morning this year. After all, who needs to give thanks and celebrate a day off spent with family when you could be taking advantage of more sales, right?

Wrong. Overhype and the head start on sales may actually eliminate the sense of urgency shoppers feel during the start of the holiday season. Why wake up at 6 a.m. after a day of feasting on turkey and mashed potatoes when you can still buy clothes, toys and electronics on sale for the same amount later in the day?

Call me crazy, but I’ve never bought into the Black Friday craze or sacrificed sleep for shopping. I was content enough to start my shopping at noon on Friday, and left the mall four hours later with a few new sweaters and coats I had gotten for 50 percent off, and that was all without waking up at an ungodly hour.

Why can’t we all just forget about buying more things and just take a moment to be thankful for what we already have? And (perhaps more importantly), can Black Friday just cease to exist already?

We love Halloween for its costumes and spookiness, and Christmas and New Year’s for extended vacations and presents and champagne. It’s time we stopped skipping over the holiday season middle child that is Thanksgiving and started giving thanks instead of giving in to consumerism.