By Samantha Wong, Staff Writer
@saaaamwong

According to an AP article, a man dressed as Cookie Monster in Times Square pushed a two year old after his mother refused to give him a tip/ PHOTO VIA https://news.uk.msn.com/trending-blog/man-dressed-as-cookie-monster-arrested-for-pushing-a-toddler-in-times-square

According to an AP article, a man dressed as Cookie Monster in Times Square pushed a two year old after his mother refused to give him a tip/ PHOTO VIA https://news.uk.msn.com/trending-blog/man-dressed-as-cookie-monster-arrested-for-pushing-a-toddler-in-times-square

According to an AP article featured on USA Today’s website, in Times Square, this month, an apparently disturbed Cookie Monster pushed a two-year old and shouted obscenities at his mother for not charitably handing over $2.  Earlier this year, an anti-Semitic Elmo pleaded guilty for disorderly conduct and a Super Mario was charged with sexually harassing a woman.

Nearly everyone has had his or her fair share of creepers. Usually, they are not dressed up as your favorite childhood game and TV show characters, which makes them significantly less, well, creepy. Nevertheless, “creepers” feature a broad range of people (i.e., creepers on the internet, creepers in day-to-day life, etc.) Creepers on the street, however, are more comfortable with confrontation than their predecessors.

How to distinguish said creeper? Here are a few tells:

  1. Inability to take “no” for an answer
  2. Shadowing even after you express disinterest
  3. Inability to take “no” for an answer (otherwise known as persistence. Or harassment.)

With experience however, dealing with creeps is relatively easy. To deal with creeps appropriately, there are a couple of steps:

  1.  The first thing to do is to effortlessly avoid them by either (a) pulling out a social network device or (b) pretending to be absolutely engrossed by something in hand.
  2.   If ‘Step 1’ cannot be completed, do not give the creep too much acknowledgement; give a terse response that could otherwise be given to a stranger asking for directions.
  3. End all attempts to further conversation.
  4.  If creep persists, humor the creep if you must, but be cautious as not to encourage the creep to entreat you for some kind of compensation.

On the whole, maintain a semblance of cool. This is to make as seamless as an experience possible with the creep. Further, if creep oversteps normal social boundaries, either (a) run away or (b) get some help if you cannot (a).