It’s time to talk about the p-word: porn. And according to a professor at Aalborg University, in Aalborg, Denmark, it should be done in the classroom. Christian Graugaard of Aalborg University went on Danish public television to say that he believes porn should be incorporated into Denmark’s sex education programs as early as eighth grade. His views on porn predictably sparked controversy abroad in Europe and would probably do the same if he said as much in America.

But what place does this discussion have in the United States? Well, seeing as though our current sex-ed system is lacking (only 19 of 22 states that require sex education in school require it to be medically accurate), why not liven it up a bit with some porn? If the soft-core pornfest of the “Twilight” movies or the kid who went to school as Christian Grey are any indications, middle schoolers are already being exposed to over-sexualized advertisements and media at a young age. One Danish teenager said it best on March 5 when he told DR, Denmark’s national broadcasting corporation, that learning about porn is important in order to recognize “real love between two people who have sex and hard porn orgies from the U.S.” I’m glad we’re globally known.

Middle school-aged kids are already being subjected to soft-core porn with "Twilight"-but should porn be shown in eighth grade classrooms as an educational tool?  PHOTO VIA DEVIANT ART

Middle school-aged kids are already being subjected to soft-core porn with “Twilight,” but should porn be shown in eighth grade classrooms as an educational tool? PHOTO VIA DEVIANT ART USER BECCA678

Eighth graders aren’t suddenly going to turn into horny messes when they discover what porn is (that’s for puberty to dictate). The worst that could happen is a kid goes home, watches some porn, giggles about it with his or her friends, and then forgets about it after playing some “Call of Duty” — or whatever violent games kids are playing these days.

It’s clear that this isn’t a conspiracy to turn children into robotic sex maniacs. In fact, it’s a push for the opposite. Graugaard told DR that children need to be taught about porn in the classroom so they can “be critical consumers who see porn with a certain distance and reflection.” People need to learn at an early age that porn gives an unrealistic expectation of sex. The average penis isn’t that big, most women’s breasts aren’t perfectly symmetrical and the majority of repairmen don’t knock on doors expecting to have sex. Usually. Porn perpetuates misconceptions about people’s bodies that children should be aware of so they don’t go through life assuming that everyone else looks better naked than they do.

Likewise, porn can be further analyzed in classrooms. By drawing comparisons to porn, children can discuss how much preparation goes into sex, become familiarized with the naked body and learn that every sexual encounter will not be smooth (especially the first one).

Now, I’m not knocking porn — I hear it’s great. But maybe eighth grade is too early to teach a child about porn. The fact of the matter is that kids are going to learn about it sometime. Children are growing up with the Internet, and they’re going to know every ugly crevice better than we do (I feel so old). And the Internet includes pornography sites. So parents, have the sex and porn talk with your kids. Don’t make it uncomfortable. It’s for his or her own good. And kids, don’t put your faith in porn. You’ll only be misled.